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Going Ape! A Systems Anthroplogy

If we look at how we humans evolved to live successfully, first in Africa, and then around the world in such vast numbers, we might be tempted to ask: how have we managed to do all that in such a relatively short time, at least in geological timescales? We might go further, and ask: how is such a creature, Homo sapiens – evolved to deal with problems of existence and survival on the open African Savannah – managing to cope with the radically different problems of today? 

 Going Ape! explores how we may have evolved, asking such tricky questions as: 'why have we shed most of our hair; why do we have such an affinity for water; why do human females, unlike any other land animal, experience the menopause; why do we avoid each others’ gaze on the underground; how are we going to survive in space, etc.?’ 

Going Ape! tracks the ascent of humans towards civilisations, which have come and gone; looks at where we are today, with our penchant for social engineering, political correctness, multicultural societies, radical feminism, etc., and finds evidence that things are beginning to look decidely less civilized!  At the same time, we are developing our technology further, regardless of any harm it might be doing, and we are learning - often through our mistakes - how to create better societies and organizations: knowing how is not doing.

Going Ape! asks, too, where is it all going, with more of us living longer in ever larger megacities, increasingly resourced through globalization, threatened by global warming, rising tides, turbuent weather systems, developing shortages of fresh water, successive energy crises, and so on. How are we going to cope in the future, with more people to feed and less land to support them? Will we have to live quite differently - or, are we, perhaps, all doomed to some dystopian future? Mmmm…

 Click to read, download, enjoy!

  Going Ape! A Systems Anthropology


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© D K Hitchins 2016